The Final Results of AIWC 2013

ASiS INTERNATIONAL ESSAY AND POETRY WRITING COMPETITION -2013

THE RESULTS–ESSAY SECTION

 1st Prize (USD 350.00 and Distinguished Award Certificate) Muhammad Fahmizikri Bin Kamarudin – SM Sains Muar, Muar, Johor, Malaysia.

2nd Prize (USD 250.00 and Distinguished Award Certificate ) Izni Inairah Binti Norzelan – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Batu Rakit, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.

3rd Prize (USD 150.00 and Distinguished Award Certificate) Muhammad Syafiq Bin Maidin – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Batu Rakit, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.

 

Consolation (USD 100.00 each and Merit Award Certificate)

4.    Maisarah Binti Mohd Mardi – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Batu Rakit, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.

5. ‘Aina Fitri Binti Mohd Hamidi – Sekolah Menengah Sains Raja Tun Azlan Shah, Taiping, Perak, Malaysia.

6. Sweta Prakash – Kendriya Vidhyalaya  NO.  2 AFS Tambaram, Chennai, India.

7. Nazirah Binti Ahmad Fathullah – Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan Puchong Perdana, Puchong, Selangor, Malaysia.

8. Syafiqah Binti Zazali – Sekolah Menengah Sains Pasir Puteh,Pasir Puteh, Kelantan, Malaysia.

9. Muhammad Hariz Bin Jamaludin –   Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Sabak Bernam, Sabak Bernam, Selangor, Malaysia.

10. Muhammad Raflees Shah Bin Azmi – Sekolah Menengah Sains Alam Shah, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

 

Certificate of Participation

11. Mohammad Afiq Bin Dolhadi – Sekolah Menengah Sains Miri, Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia.

12. Azmal Husain Bin Seeni Mohd – Sekolah Menengah Sains Alam Shah,Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

13. Nurul Izziany Binti Ramli – Sekolah Menengah Sains Sultan Iskandar,Mersing,Johor,Malaysia.

 

 THE RESULTS –POETRY SECTION

1st Prize (USD 350.00 and Distinguished Award Certificate) Lim Li Ann – Sekolah Menengah Sri KDU, Kota Damansara, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

2nd Prize (USD 250.00 and Distinguished Award Certificate)  Ammar Haziq Bin Hishamuddin – Sekolah Menengah Sains Muar, Muar, Johor, Malaysia.

3rd Prize (USD 150.00 and Distinguished Award Certificate) Shabbir Hashim – Beacon House School System, Lahore, Pakistan.

 

Consolation (USD 100.00 each and Merit Award Certificate)

4. Alexandria Monica Johnson– Wesley Methodist School, Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia.

5. Najwatul Husna Binti Mohd Noor – Sekolah Menengah Sains Sultan Haji Ahmad Shah, Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia.

6. Dzaireel Aiman Bin Dzainul – SM Sains Alam Shah, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

7. Shlok Prakash – Kendriya Vidhyalaya No 2, AFS Tambaram, Chennai, India.

8. Muhammad Harith Daniel Bin Azman – SM Sains Alam Shah, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

9. Mohammed Syafizie Bin Mohd Safiee – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Sabak Bernam, Sabak Bernam, Selangor, Malaysia.

10. Siti Nur Aishah Binti Muhamat Kamal – SM Sains Muzaffar Syah, Melaka, Malaysia.

 

Certificate of Participation

11. Ainur Sahira Binti Noordin – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Gombak, Gombak, Selangor, Malaysia.

12. Balqis Binti Bakri – SM Sains Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.

13. Nur Aina Shahira Binti Norazami – SM Sains Raja Tun Azlan Shah, Taiping, Perak, Malaysia.

14. Ahmad Afiq Bin Azahari– SM Sains Alam Shah, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

15. Nuratiqah Binti Mohd Fadzli – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Gombak, Gombak, Selangor, Malaysia.

16. Ahmad Abdul Mun’im Bin Ismail – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Rawang, Rawang, Selangor, Malaysia.

17 Nur Haziqah Aini Binti Rosli – Sekolah Berasrama Penuh Integrasi Gombak, Gombak, Selangor, Malaysia.

Posted in AIWC2013, Essay, Poems, Result, Winner | Leave a comment

The Top Three Essays

ESSAY  SECTION

THE WINNING ESSAY BY MUHAMMAD FAHMIZIKRI BIN KAMARUDIN FROM SEKOLAH MENENGAH SAINS MUAR, JOHOR MALAYSIA.

SUMMARY

The essay starts off with a brief explanation on why illegal wildlife trade is dangerous. The essay then continues with facts and figures on the evils of illegal wildlife trading starting with overexploitation of wildlife resource. It could also cause loss of researches and knowledge of the wildlife world. Illegal wildlife trading will unravel the living ecosystem, harming natural necessities. A nation can be discredited due to illegal wildlife trade. It is also proved that massive disease outbreak appears result to wildlife trafficking. Content six elaborates on how illegal wildlife trade could lead to many innocent animal deaths. Illegal wildlife trade is also considered as ways of animal tortures. Furthermore, illegal wildlife trade sets an example on why some invasive species are unwelcomed. Plus, illegal wildlife trading is increasing gradually due to human demands towards wildlife products which prove to be fatal. Even crimes can mount through illegal wildlife trading.  Livelihoods of some nations that depend on wildlife resource could also be altered. Finally, based on the information I conclude the essay with ways on how to stop illegal wildlife trading could be stopped and ending it with a shout out to stop illegal wildlife

Imagine yourself as a wild animal living in the wildlife ecosystem, living freely without any restrictions. The sun’s ultraviolet rays penetrating through the dense forest, the leaves rustle slowly as breeze wafts through the branches, and fresh scent of fresh air invigorates the body make you picture that it is going to be a great day. All of a sudden, you felt a slight pinch on your back followed by a second one on the neck. Your eyes became gloomier as the sight fades out. The second you woke up you saw a bright light. You taught that it was the sun but as you regain consciousness you saw four bulbs shone straight at you. Then you started to look around for clues trying to figure out what had happened. You realise that you were tied on a surgical bed, both hands and feet. You saw syringes, knives, drugs, bars, locks, guards, hounds and many other animal species caged around you. Some of them were still asleep. Others showed pale faces of fear. Out of the blue, a monkey went flinging and screaming around his cage. A guard rose from his seat with a strangler and tranquilizer. Two shots were heard and the cage went silent. The guard went back to his seat and reported it to the supervisor. They mocked the animals and make it look as if it was the right thing to do. Then, a surgeon dressed in an all- white robe coming towards you with a syringe in his hand. He injected it on your right arm and again you passed out. This was an example of the life and times of an illegal smuggling scenario. Millions of wildlife species have been transported from one country to another for many reasons. Most of the animals smuggled were either sold or operated for their rare and valuable parts. At about 350 million wildlife species involved annually.

Every now and then thousands of wildlife species or parts are being traded illegally. The question now is what have you done to stop illegal animal trade? How does illegal wildlife trade become a threat towards the environment? Weak judicial systems, high profit margins, and the ever increasing demands for wildlife parts have driven illegal wildlife trading to be a dangerous environmental issue. Not many people realise the threat and danger that illegal wildlife trade could make. In fact it is considered the second most dangerous threat towards wildlife behind habitat destructions. The money earned from the illegal trade of living animals and dead animal parts is roughly equal to that illegal weapons smuggling and second only to drugs as an illegal business. The value of the illegal wildlife trade is estimated at US$10-20 billion annually by some experts. Asia is considered as the substantial portion of the global illegal wildlife trade, followed by the North and South Americas. Most arrest cases regarding this issue only punishes the lower rank members of an operation leaving the masterminds and other members safe from any sort of danger. These factors make illegal wildlife trading a low risk business with high returns. Nowadays, demands for wildlife products from consumers are increasing annually because laws on illegal wildlife in some countries are so lax that it did not seem to make any cognition towards the guilty party. The authorities should see through this matter and take quick action in order to stop it before it is too late. Consumers demands wildlife products for many reasons which includes live pets, hunting trophies, fashion accessories, cultural artifacts, ingredients for traditional medicines, and wild meat for human consumption.

Overexploiting wildlife resource could produce many major impacts. One of them is the massive and irrevocable biodiversity loss. Worldwide, 7,725 species of animals, from insects and birds to gorillas, elephants and reptiles, are considered at risk of extinction. That’s 20% of all known mammal species and 12% of known species of birds threatened with being lost forever. What will happen to the world in 20 years’ time? Will rhinos still walk the earth? Or will tiger roars still be heard? Vulnerable wild animals are pushed further to the edge of extinction when nature can’t replenish their stocks to keep up with the rate of human consumption. With species being removed from the wild faster than they can repopulate their inputs to critical natural processes and ecosystem resilience are lost. Left unchecked, wildlife trafficking threatens to unravel the entire ecosystems. For example, Southeast Asia is blessed with wildlife beauty. Millions of wildlife species live in the region. Some are so rare like the orang-utan can only be found in Southeast Asia. It is considered as the treasure of the region in which attracted poachers and consumers from all around the globe. Even so Southeast Asia is considered as one of the largest wildlife black hole with thousands of wildlife species sold monthly. Now, many rainforests in Southeast Asia are considered as empty shells. Why? Because its forest only possesses full of large trees and abundant plant life but short of large mammals, many of which have been killed by snares. If trends continue, scientists predict 13-42% of Southeast Asia’s animal and plant species could be wiped out this century. At least half of those losses would represent global extinctions. This is because not all of the million wildlife species exist in Southeast Asia is closely looked. A few species have been over looked which led the poachers to get an easy catch. Southeast Asian authorities should seek through and make quick action in order to save the region’s most precious treasure.

Not only that, overexploitation of wildlife resources could cause significant loss in research and knowledge. Wildlife studies in the future will be different without professions of some wildlife species. Unregistered and loss animal researches could produce multiple problems such as medical capabilities. Without further investigation human cannot produce antidotes. Imagine you have been bitten by The Adder, an endangered snake, and the hospital had no effective antidotes to fight the venom. Thus, you started feeling nauseous and dizzy, vomit every single minute and exert painful swelling on the bitten area. Further research could avoid this deadly cause and decrease the number of death regarding other animal attacks. Not only that, the world could lose a profession on a wildlife species if there is extinction. Less profession leads to a decrease in number of scholars in universities. Fewer scholars’ means less workers and less number of workers will then corrode the economy of a nation one dollar at a time. It’s not fair to see generations from the past who works hard to investigate and do researches without sufficient equipment compared to our generation who has a complete set of modern day equipment just simply letting go off a foundation that had become an inspiration and source of revision by many. In other words, knowledge must be appreciated by any means necessary. It’s not about what we have; it’s what we make from it that counts.

Moreover, unravelling of the living ecosystems could underpin essential environmental services. Animal plays an important part in the ecosystem. What is ecosystem? An ecosystem is a community of living organisms including plants, animals and microbes in conjunction with the non-living components of their environment such as air, water and mineral soil interacting as a system. Energy, water, nitrogen and soil minerals are other essential components of an ecosystem. Biodiversity affects ecosystem function, as do the processes of disturbance and succession. Ecosystems provide a variety of goods and services upon which people depend. Imagine this, the sun give out heat energy so that plants can undergo photosynthesis. Energy and carbon enter ecosystems through photosynthesis, are incorporated into living tissue, transferred to other organisms that feed on the living and dead plant matter, and eventually released through respiration. Most mineral nutrients, on the other hand, are recycled within ecosystems. Plants produce food through photosynthesis which is then eaten by animals. Animals produce faeces through defecation and release nutrients making the soil more fertile. Water flowing through rivers absorbs nutrients from the soil making it more nutritious. Man than take water and use it in daily life and sanify the body. Any disturbance in the ecosystem will lower the probability of a successful nutrient flow and jeopardize the efficiency of the system. Animals also provide other necessities in life such meat, milks, and oils. Therefore, illegal wildlife trade should be prevented to avoid any disturbance in the ecosystem.

Moving on, this environmental crime discredits many nations. With no certain accusation nations such as India, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Thailand, Indonesia, and even United States of America are all embroiled to this issue. India has been a centre of the illegal animal parts trade for some time. Animals markets in Calcutta and the state of Bihar often have animals kept in horrid conditions. While in Cambodia, animal parts from endangered animals are sold openly in Phnom Penh. In the early 2000s at Orussie market and Street 166 in Phnom Penh shops and vendors openly sell body parts from endangered animals; guar skulls, tiger teeth and bones, bear bile, crocodile heads elephant tails, ivory, antlers, lizard skins and feathers from are birds. Occasionally shops had skins from tigers and clouded leopards. Bangkok, Thailand is regarded as one of the biggest wild animal smuggling centres in the world. It is a major gateway and transit area for animals on their way from source nations to buyer nations. The chances are whatever animal or animal part a buyer is interested in whether it be live lemurs, crocodiles, gibbons orang-utan babies, endangered cockatoos, bear paws, or tiger bones all can be found in Bangkok with the right contacts. Indonesia is a major source and a hub for the trade of endangered species. Rare animals from Indonesia are both sold in Indonesia and smuggled out of the country, primarily to Bangkok where they can reach a bigger market and fetch higher prices. The National Wildlife Property Repository in Denver is the resting place for 1.5 million confiscated items connected with illegal animal trade in the U.S. These actions does not just degrades the expectations towards these thriving countries but also humiliates and discrete the nations.

Furthermore, human health is endangered by unregulated trade in wild animals that can spread and pass on viruses and diseases. Avian Influenza, for example, was transferred from wild animals to human beings. Avian influenza is known informally as avian flu or bird flu which refers to influenza caused by viruses adapted to birds. The version with the greatest concern is highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Most human contractions of the avian flu are a result of either handling dead infected birds or from contact with infected fluids. While most wild birds mainly have only a mild form of the H5N1 strain, once domesticated birds such as chickens or turkeys are infected, it could become much more deadly because the birds are often within close contact of one another. Although it is easy for humans to become infected from birds, it’s much more difficult to do so from human to human without close and lasting contact. H5N1 has killed millions of poultry in a growing number of countries throughout Asia, Europe, and Africa. Health experts are concerned that the coexistence of human flu viruses and avian flu viruses especially H5N1 will provide an opportunity for genetic material to be exchanged between species-specific viruses, possibly creating a new virulent influenza strain that is easily transmissible and lethal to humans. The mortality rate for humans with H5N1 is 60%.Since the first H5N1 outbreak occurred in 1987, there has been an increasing number of an HPAI H5N1 bird-to-human transmission, leading to clinically severe and fatal human infections. This proves that illegal wildlife trafficking could harm an entire human civilization and produce one of the most dangerous disease outbreaks.

In addition, illegal wildlife trades leads to many incidental killing of non-target species. Marine life is being threatened by human activities. 90 percent of large fish have been removed from the ocean because of overfishing. It is estimated that over a quarter of the global marine fisheries catch is incidental, unwanted, and discarded. Many dolphins and seabirds were caught by fishing gear. An estimated 1 billion people worldwide depend upon fish and shellfish as their main source of protein. Now, how will these 1billion people ensure their everyday protein needs if the marine wildlife is wiped out holistically? What will fishmonger do for a living by then? Like marine species killed through by catch, incidental killing of animals also happens on land. When, crude traps set for musk deer or duikers or which causes damage and death to a variety of animals besides those intended. Human should be responsible for every action that they make. Think about it, what will modern day cowboys make for a living? Will there still be fresh meat from livestock? How will the economy stand? Because without animals farmers, fisherman, fishmongers, and breeders could not generate enough money for daily use and without money, the national economy could face quite a troublesome issue in the coming days. With low annual income, developments, progresses, and security plans of a slow developing nation could pose to a halt. Although, this cause is still rated as a low priority matter but it could prove to be fatal like an old saying a little something could go a long way, in this case a very long one.

By the way, have you ever wonder how human use wildlife products. Nowadays, wildlife is traded for many reasons and that includes the sale of live animals for pets, rare butterflies for collectors, and animal parts for medicines or exotic garments or food cuisines or even for the latest fashion trends. How do they obtain these products? It involves hunting, killing, tranquilizing, surgeries, peeling, scraping, freezing, and other methods in common. Trust me it’s a horrible sight. They will do anything to exploit these wildlife products. Primates are commonly traded for pets but some are traded for their flesh. Can you imagine a human eating an ape like a cannibal? In Thailand, there is a restaurant that serves bears. Animal skin is widely used in transportation and fashion products for example, alligators skins that adorn eight pairs of $2,000 Air Force 1s seats. Wildlife parts are also used for traditional medical use. Asia has a variety of traditional medications which consider many types of parts and wildlife species. For instance, China is well known for their own style of medication. Thousands of liquids and extracts from thousands of wildlife species that was said to cure various types of illness. Wildlife species that were used includes from the most venomous to the strong herbal ones. Does it really work? Chinese will tell you that their traditional medicines are a bit milder than western medicine. Some of the Western medicine is sort of invasive and makes you dependent to it. The Chinese ones tend to do less but if taken properly they don’t cause as many side effects. Some say it’s a medical breakthrough but to me it is just another way of animal tortures. Animals are also living things they deserve to live freely.

Wildlife trade can also cause indirect harm through introducing invasive species which then prey on, or compete with, native species. Invasive species are as big a threat to the balance of nature as the direct overexploitation by humans of some species. Why some species are unwelcome? Invasive species are plants or animals that do not belong where humans have intentionally or accidentally brought them. IUCN, the World Conservation Union, states that the impacts of alien invasive species are immense, insidious, and usually irreversible. They may be as damaging to native species and ecosystems on a global scale as the loss and degradation of habitats. Hundreds of extinctions have been caused by invasive alien species. The ecological cost is the irretrievable loss of native species and ecosystems. The mongoose threatens endemic species on tropical cane-growing islands. They have caused the population demise or extinction of many endemic vertebrates, and continue to cause livestock damage while posing a disease risk. European red foxes introduced into Australia and temperate regions of North America have negative impacts on many native species, including smaller cyanides and ground nesting birds in North America, and many small and medium-sized rodent and marsupial species in Australia. Just as overfishing causes imbalances in the whole marine system, our complex web of life on earth depends on careful and thoughtful use of wildlife species and their habitats. This matter needs seeking through to evade another possible disaster.

This ever exasperating environment issue is proof that humanity is becoming more demanding and extreme. It shows how dangerous human can be towards the wildlife world. The fact that it corrodes the good deeds that human can provide and emits more of human’s wickedness side. That is why experts say that humans are Mother Nature’s greatest fear. All of the animal hunting, wood logging, forest clearing, and wildlife trading are all increasing to meets the demands of consumers. We should reorganise and recalculate the wildlife resources to avoid overexploitation. Animals cannot speak up. They need humans to help them with that. If they could than all of us will starve to death. So, be wise the next time you demands wildlife products. We could reuse, reduce, and recycle wildlife parts. You could recycle almost anything in this time. It’s the twenty-first century for god sake, anything goes. The world is at our fingertips. Politicians and businessman could discussed together to avoid any biased solution. This way the economy and resource can sustain for a longer period of time. We need strategies, programs, researches that could ensure balance between the fast-development and resource management growth. Without careful observations, resources might run out faster than we expect due to development and without efficient planning resources may be left unused. Cooperation is the key to a great achievement in both development and economy. Humans should reconsider the wildlife needs other than their own needs.

Plus, organized crime is strengthened by profits from illegal wildlife trade. Links are now being detected between wildlife crime, drug trafficking and human trafficking. The money earned from the illegal trade of living animals and dead animal parts is roughly equal to that illegal weapons smuggling and second only to drugs as an illegal business. Many smugglers who made a living in gold and narcotics now are into wildlife trading. Prices will not drop as the wildlife goods are becoming rare. This ensures the income of poachers that led to the maximum number of traders. An international crime syndicate makes profit from the illegal animal trade which includes the trafficking of ivory, tiger parts, rhinoceros horn, shark fin, exotic birds, reptile skin, bush meat and wildlife products is to at least $10 billion and may be twice that. Among the animals and animal products available on the web are a young giraffes for $15,000, a black leopard for $4,000 gorilla for $8,131, baby chimpanzees for $60,000, cotton-top tamarinds for $2,500, hawksbill turtle shells for $120, elephant bone sculptures for $18,000, crocodile skin boots, seahorse skeletons, ivory sculptures, and shahtoosh shawls. Poachers get easy cash and species becomes threatened with every trade. These profits pioneered by criminals make it one of the major problems in illegal wildlife trading. Just imagine, a gang becomes an organisation, a pistol becomes a rifle, and a fight becomes a war. I bet that it is going to be hectic future unless we do something about it. With the power and money the criminals possessed, the world could be a scary place to live and with that illegal wildlife trades could rise up abruptly. Authorities from all around the world should gather and discuss the issue quickly in order to stop this madness from spreading. So, as an old saying, there’s no better time like now.

Last but not least, illegal wildlife trade is also altering livelihoods of some nations. Local wildlife is considered an important resource by many communities, often the poorest, in the developing world. Some rural households depend on wild animals for protein, trees for fuel, and both wild animals and plants for natural cures. Most nations in the Central African region whom is still living in huts, used old ways to search for food such as, hunting, that relies on the natural stocks of wildlife. There, modern day medications are rarely found. So, they use the traditional way with various types of herbs, plants and extracts. For the record, rain is rarely poured down in central Africa which results a hot and unsustainable land to grow. In other words life is tough in the stretch, and with other pressures in survival wildlife needs is extremely precious. So, the next time you say that life is hard always remember that someone out there is having a life harder than you ever imagine. And with every trade, desperation is mounting quickly. Desperation could cause all sorts of problems like crimes, illness, even death. Crimes like steals, seizes, fights, and other interrogations could occur in which it could impend the peace of a nation. Desperation could also drive people into making irrational decisions and activities. This will open up the chances for crime syndicates to recruit new members. Thus, leading towards a major increase in the numbers of poachers worldwide and decreases the chance of wildlife survival. Where have we been when our brothers and sisters are starving? How could we have just left them suffering without any sympathy? Is this really who we are? People all around the world should embrace the spirit of togetherness and continuously give hope and love towards each other. Because once we lose hope an entire civilization is lost.

There are many ways we could contribute to stop this environment disaster and it requires two things which are will and passion. People of all ages can help in their own respective way. For instance, as a student like me learning and studying this matter is considered as a contribution. How? First, it showed us the danger of illegal wildlife trade. Second, we understand and adapt it in our daily lifestyle and third, we support programs and spread it to our friends and one good deed could lead to a cycle of kindness. If you are a tailor, try not to use leather skins on clothing. You could just raise the awareness of people around and estrange your customers from threatening the wildlife world. As a parent, you should show your support and seriousness by showing positive attitudes to your kids. This early exposure creates the foundation required to engender a generation that love and protects nature for the coming years. Even if you are a robber you could still contribute by stealing wildlife products. These way poachers could lose their profits and interest towards wildlife trades but please robbery is still a crime and I am not instigating you to steal. Less consumption means more species growth and more growth means repopulation of endangered species and repopulation means more biodiversity saved from extinction. This shows that you don’t have to be an official wildlife speaker to contribute. People of all ages could give a helping hand and solve this matter. Don’t wait; start now because actions speak louder than words.

Based on my researches, I conclude that illegal wildlife trading is an environmental enemy that is lurking and harming the wildlife world slowly but steadily like a parasite and it’s because of that not many people understand the possible threat and danger that it could bring to the world. I mean what were we thinking? How could we use them in such matter? Every animal that we trade, the possibility of extinctions is greatly and continuously increasing and without instant actions animals becomes endangered every day. When did we become so greedy and selfish? Does it have to be all about us? Can’t we give them a chance to be cared? Let us change our perspective towards wildlife. Spread out the word. People need to realise that their actions are contributing to a potential mass destruction. Boycott endangered wildlife goods. Designers should think of an eco-friendly fashion line that would help to reduce wildlife usage. Authorities should have arranged a meeting to solve this issue. I suggest law synchronization towards the guilty party. Non-government organisations (NGOs) such as WWF, TRAFFIC, IUCN, and others should arrange speeches, wildlife camps, educational programs, or even campaigns to share information, provide education, and instil the correct character in people. Students should be exposed with facts that would encourage them to ban illegal wildlife trade. They deserve better than us in the future. Everybody must contribute and stop this madness at once. Well you know what they say there is safety in numbers. I am not expecting for a drastic change. Even Rome wasn’t built in a day. This process takes time and patience and perseverance in order to achieve total success. Together we could evade perhaps one of the most devastating disasters of all time. Stop illegal wildlife trade, you can make a difference.

 

REFERENCES

  • Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia, wikipedia.org
  • ILLEGAL ANIMAL TRADE – World Topics | Facts and Details, factsanddetails.com
  • World Wildlife Fund (WWF), worldwildlife.org
  • EcoHealth Alliance, www.ecohealthalliance.org
  • Proverbs and Sayings, www.englishclub.com
  • Education & Programs, www.marinelifestudies.com
  • Dial Beijing – Endangered and exotic species in traditional Chinese meds, gbtimes.com
  • IFAW – International Fund for Animal Welfare, www.ifaw.org
  • FREELAND – Foundation for a World Free of Wildlife Trafficking and Human Slavery, freeland.org
  • Dictionary, Encyclopaedia, and Thesaurus – The Free Dictionary, www.thefreedictionary.com
  • Wildlife Alliance – Direct Protection to Wildlife and Forests, wildlifealliance.org

 

 

IN SECOND PLACE IS IZNI INAIRAH BINTI NORZELAN FROM SEKOLAH BERASRAMA PENUH INTEGRASI BATU RAKIT, TERENGGANU, MALAYSIA.

SUMMARY

The illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to the survival of some of the world’s rarest species. In fact it’s second only to habitat destruction as a cause of species loss and potential extinction. We’re killers of those other species of life that share this planet with us. Some we kill for food, like domesticated animals, or the wild fish and game we harvest from the waters and the forest. The world is dealing with an unprecedented spike in illegal wildlife trade, threatening to overturn decades of conservation gains. Some examples of illegal wildlife trade are well known such as poaching of elephants for ivory and tigers for their skins and bones. Wildlife trafficking is driven by organised groups who exploit natural resources and endanger threatened species and ecosystems in contravention of CITES. The authorities have taken many ways to prevent this crime by setting up a series of protected parks, areas that is particularly threatening are called “wildlife trade hotspots” and enforce the law so that the guilty will get pay for their crime. We should step up our efforts to tackle this deadly and destructive trade  and we need to turn things around for the best.

Human beings are killers. Not just toward each other, though we do that of course, every hour of every day. We’re killers of those other species of life that share this planet with us. Some we kill for food, like domesticated animals, or the wild fish and game we harvest from the waters and the forest. Others we kill by as a by-product of modern life, taking their habitat through deforestation or pollution. But many, too many, we simply kill for their parts. Or perhaps murder is the better word.

The threat of wildlife trafficking is on my mind, as the biennial meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) continues over the next two weeks in Bangkok. Born 40 years ago, CITES sets the global controls for trade in wildlife, with a focus — at its best — of slowing the slaughter and trafficking of endangered species. For years there was real progress being made in the field. After low points during the 1980s, nations under CITES began to successfully crack down on the illicit ivory trade, which drove the wide-scale poaching of rhinos and elephants in Africa. Between 1973 and 2012, the population of the white rhino in Africa rose from 2,000 to over 19,000 and other endangered species made comebacks, thanks to international sanctions on ivory trade and tougher prosecution on the ground in Africa.

But those advances — and the endangered species — are at risk. Last year poaching levels in Africa were at their highest since international monitors began keeping detailed records in 2002. In 2011 a record amount of illegal ivory was seized worldwide: 38.8 tons, equal to the tusks that would be found on more than 4,000 dead elephants. According to CITES’ own numbers, an estimated 25,000 elephants were poached across Africa in 2011, and in South Africa alone 668 rhinos were killed by poachers last year. And the wildlife trade is having a serious impact on biodiversity as well. According to a new study published in the open journal PLOS ONE, in central Africa an astounding 62% of all forest elephants — slightly smaller than the better-known African savannah elephant — have been killed for their ivory over the past decade. “The analysis confirms what conservationists have feared: the rapid trend toward extinction — potentially within the next decade — of the forest elephant,” Samantha Strindberg of the Wildlife Conservation Society, one of the lead authors of the PLOS ONE study, said in a statement. The forest elephant — and other species — are being hunted to death.

The world is dealing with an unprecedented spike in illegal wildlife trade, threatening to overturn decades of conservation gains. Ivory estimated to weigh more than 23 metric tons—a figure that represents 2,500 elephants—was seized in the 13 largest seizures of illegal ivory in 2011. Poaching threatens the last of our wild tigers that number as few as 3,200.Wildlife crime is a big business. Run by dangerous international networks, wildlife and animal parts are trafficked much like illegal drugs and arms. By its very nature, it is almost impossible to obtain reliable figures for the value of illegal wildlife trade. Experts at TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, estimate that it runs into hundreds of millions of dollars.

Some examples of illegal wildlife trade are well known, such as poaching of elephants for ivory and tigers for their skins and bones. However, countless other species are similarly overexploited, from marine turtles to timber trees. Not all wildlife trade is illegal. Wild plants and animals from tens of thousands of species are caught or harvested from the wild and then sold legitimately as food, pets, ornamental plants, leather, tourist ornaments and medicine. Wildlife trade escalates into a crisis when an increasing proportion is illegal and unsustainable—directly threatening the survival of many species in the wild.

Indonesia has more unique species of mammals, birds, and butterflies than any other country in the world. This diversity has made it a hot-spot for illegal wildlife trafficking, which loses the country an estimated 80 million dollars a year.The further Indonesia’s exotic species are removed from their habitat, the more valuable they become. An orangutan for example, which is only found on two islands in the world, can be purchased for five dollars in Borneo, but can sell for over $10,000 once it leaves the country. Until now, the weak threat of law enforcement has done little to deter traffickers from the lure of these high profits. Even though endangered species are sold in broad daylight at Jakarta’s animal markets, arrests are infrequent. But a pair of recent prosecutions could be a sign that Indonesia is stepping up their fight against illegal animal trafficking

Only two wildlife traders have been successfully imprisoned in Indonesia. The first in 2010, and more recently in February of this year, when a 26-year-old man from Sumatra was given seven months in jail for trying to sell an Orangutan. The Wildlife Conservation Society, an American organization with a crimes unit in Jakarta, assisted with the crime investigation that lead to his arrest.

The resurgence of poaching is driven by two connected factors. One is the tremendous increase in the demand for ivory and other animals products, especially in Asia and particularly in China. That demand isn’t new — ivory has long been used in Asia for art and in traditional medicine. In Vietnam, for instance, ground rhino horn has become popular as a cure in cancer. (Needless to say, it doesn’t work.) What’s changed, though, is economic growth — more money in places like China mean more consumers willing to spend more money to buy ivory in all its forms.

That makes ivory all the more valuable, and when an interdicted product — like illegal drugs — becomes more valuable, criminal gangs get very interested. That is what’s happened with poaching, as Africa-based, Asian-run crime syndicates get into the wildlife-trafficking business. It’s perfect from their perspective — wildlife trafficking still has a low risk of detection and persecution, and what penalties do exist tend to be much lighter than those that accompany drug convictions. Wildlife officers in African countries are poor and outgunned, which makes them that much easier to bribe or, in some sad cases, simply kill. That sharp increase in ivory seizures in recent years is a sign of just how involved big gangs are getting in the trade — only professional criminals with continent-spanning networks could move hundreds of pounds of tusks at a time.

Over the weekend, New York Times reporter Thomas Fuller profiled one such crime boss: the Laotian Vixay Keosavang, who one investigator called the “Pablo Escobar of wildlife trafficking”: The case is especially frustrating to those outside Laos, who say Mr. Vixay appears untouchable as long as he remains in his home country, where, they say, officials have refused to do a thorough investigation despite the reams of evidence presented to them. And without stopping him, wildlife officials and investigators say, they have little hope of breaking down a business empire that they say connects the African savanna to the Asian jungles and ultimately to customers of ivory and traditional medicines in Vietnam and China.

An adult rhinoceros in Africa, during his late night walk, falls in a perfectly dug pit lined with spikes to die a slow and painful death. Another rhino in India touches a cable wire that sends 11 kilowatts jolt through its massive body, electrocuting it. Their horns are pulled out. Price of each horn: US$450,000. Deep inside a tiger sanctuary, a carcass is laced with deadly poison as bait for the unsuspecting tiger. The tiger eats the dead meat only to die a painful and horrific death. Price: On Request – Because every little body part of tiger is shamefully high to quote. Orangutan babies are one of the most wanted pets. To catch a baby orangutan, its mother is killed for she would fiercely fight for the safety of its child. Price of a baby orangutan, apart from the price that its mother paid with her life: $45,000. An unsuspecting Slow Loris is trapped. Its canine teeth are brutally extracted using pliers, without any anesthetic, to prevent it from biting. It is joined by hundreds of others as a major consignment. It endures this painful hell and infection only to be sold for $.4,500. Pregnant mothers are killed to get the unborn fetal lamb. The fetal pelt is made into exquisite fur. A coat made of broadtail fur of 30 fetal lambs is not for everyone – but can be found in the high end fashion stores fetching anywhere between $13,000 – $25,000. The instances of this gory trade are varied many and more horrific than the other.

Stamping out wildlife crime is a priority for WWF because it’s the largest direct threat to the future of many of the world’s most threatened species. It is second only to habitat destruction in overall threats against species survival.Hunting for the illegal wildlife trade has the greatest potential to do maximum harm in minimal time,and is a serious threat to a number of endangered and vulnerable species. Illegal wildlife trade and contraband includes live pets, hunting trophies, fashion accessories, cultural artifacts, ingredients for traditional medicines, and wild meat for human consumption. Bushmeat trade is considered illegal when imports occur in contravention of the Washington Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES), national quarantine laws, and other laws that ban the trade of specific animals.

Illegal wildlife trade is broadly defined as an environmental crime, which directly harms the environment. Wildlife trafficking is driven by organised groups who exploit natural resources and endanger threatened species and ecosystems in contravention of CITES. Environmental crimes by their very nature are trans-boundary, using porous borders, and involve cross-border criminal syndicates characterised by irregularmigrationmoney launderingcorruption and the exploitation of disadvantaged communities.

The links between wealthpoverty and engagement in the wildlife trade are complex where people involved in the trade are not necessarily poor, and the poor who are involved do not capture the majority of the trade’s monetary value. In 2002, the illegal wildlife trade was estimated it to be the second largest illegal trade, second only to the drugs trade, with a value of at least £10 billion. In 2008, it was estimated that it is worth at least US$5 billion, and may potentially total in excess of $20 billion annually. This ranks the illegal wildlife trade as among the most lucrative illicit economies in the world, behind illegal drugs and possibly human trafficking and arms trafficking. Due to its clandestine nature, the illegal trade is difficult to quantify with any accuracy. Potential areas of market growth include the Internet, where traders use chat rooms and auction websites to engage in illicit wildlife sales.

Whereas in Europe, the revenues generated by the trafficking in endangered species are estimated at 18 to 26 billion Euros (approx. 32 billion US$) per year, with the EU the foremost destination market in the world. The trade is principally coordinated by well organised, loose networks based in the EU and in the source regions. It is now common for perpetrators to use couriers and air mail-orders. Animals from several destinations are concentrated in one place, from which it is possible to organise transit into the EU. A number of highly sophisticated Colombian groups manage the supply chains for a wide variety of species. Chinese organised crime groups, based mainly in Hong Kong, have specialised in the supply ofTraditional Chinese Medicine products containing derivatives of endangered species to several companies across the EU, particularly in North West Europe.

Within the EU, dedicated organised crime groups often exploit legitimate business structures to facilitate the importation and retail of specimens. Groups in North West Europe, for instance, cooperate with breeders in other Member States to launder ‘wild caught’ animals, using false documents to trade them as captive bred on the legitimate market. Difficulties in ascertaining the authenticity of foreign certificates frustrate enforcement efforts. Of note, there is evidence that trafficking in endangered species is of increasing interest to poly-criminal organised crime groups. Groups involved in high-level drugs trafficking in Brazil, Colombia and Mexico have established a notable role in the illegal supply of endangered species to the EU and US markets. As a result, some of the concealment methods developed for drug trafficking are now used to traffic endangered species.

Meanwhile for the global perspective in the Middle East, there is a large illegal trade in free-living houbara bustards, trapped in PakistanIran and Afghanistan, which are exported to the Middle East where they are used by some falconers to train their falcons. By the end of the 1990s, 4000–7000 houbaras were traded in this way from Pakistan each year. In 1998, initiatives were taken in Abu Dhabi and Sharjah to confiscate illegally imported houbara bustards when they entered the United Arab Emirates, while government agencies in Pakistan actively confiscate birds as they are smuggled out of the country through air and sea ports. After the Haj of 2010, skins of pythons and other reptilestigers, and of Arabian leopards poached in Yemen were offered among the products being sold in the tent city of Mina, Saudi Arabia. Endangered animal parts are smuggled into the Kingdom, often with little effort in disguising or hiding the items. In May 2011, a United Arab Emirates citizen was arrested as he was preparing to fly first class from Bangkok to Dubai with various rare and endangered animals in his suitcases, which included four leopard cubs, one Asiatic black bearcub, and two macaque monkeys.

In Asia, a substantial portion of the global illegal wildlife trade — possibly the largest in the world — takes place in Asia, where demand is driven by the need for specific animal parts to practice traditional Asian medicine, for human consumption, and as symbols of wealth. Demand for illegal wildlife is reportedly increasing in Southeast Asia due in part to the region’s economic boom and resulting affluence. Southeast Asia is also a key supplier of wildlife products to the world. Live animals and animal parts such as tortoises, fresh water turtlessnakessharkspangolins and monitor lizards are sold in open-air markets and end up as pets, trophies, or in specialty restaurants that feature wildlife as gourmet dining.

China is the world’s largest importer of wildlife products, including an insatiable demand for turtles, ivorytigerspangolins, and many other species used for food or medicine.India and Nepal feature as source and transit for the trade in body parts of tigersrhinosleopardssnow leopardsotters and musk deer for usages in traditional Chinese medicine, and for decorative use by the neo rich. Traders use land-routes via Sikkim, Ladakh and Tibet as borders are porous and customs lax. Skins and body parts of 783 tigers, 2766 leopards, and 777 otters were seized between 1994 to August 2006 in India alone, probably representing a tiny fraction of the actual trade bound for Tibet and China.  Among the many seizures of live and dead pangolins in Southeast Asian countries, these were the largest ready for export to China: in spring 2008, two shipments containing about 23 t of dead pangolins and scales were discovered in Vietnam originating in Indonesia; in July 2008, some 14 t of frozen Malayan pangolins and about 50 kg of scales were seized in Sumatra.

In Thailand, the Chatuchak weekend market which is located in Bangkok is an important hub for the sale of freshwater  turtles and tortoises for pets. People who comes from JapanMalaysia and Singapore are known to purchase large numbers of turtles from the dealers for retail in their respective countries. The international wildlife trade is a serious conservation problem, addressed by the United Nations‘ Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora CITES, which currently has 175 member countries called Parties. The majority of the illegally sourced species observed during surveys carried out in 2006 and 2007, or confiscated in recent years were not native to Thailand, but originated in some countries such as Indonesia, Indochina, Madagascar, Congo, Venezuela and many other countries. The illegal trade in live elephants and ivory still flourishes.

Seizures in Asia and Africa in recent years appear to have severely reduced the availability of African raw ivory, and prices increased on average over 300% since 2001. However, Thailand still has one of the largest and most active ivory industries seen anywhere in the world. Every year, many elephants are illegally imported from Myanmar for use in the tourism industry; elephant calves are slated for begging on the streets. The sale of lizardsprimates, cats and other endangered species has been widely documented. The Suvarnabhumi International Airport offers smugglers direct jet service to Europe, the Middle EastNorth America and Africa. Trade routes connecting in Southeast Asia link to the United States for the sale of turtles, lemurs, and other primates, Cambodia to Japan for the sale of slow lorises as pets, and the sale of many species to China.

In Vietnam, 14,758 cases involving wildlife hunting and trade violations were identified and prosecuted from 1996 to March 2007, and about 635 tons of wildlife with a total of 181,670 individual animals was confiscated. The data showed an increasing trend in the number of wildlife violations, from 1,469 cases in 2000 to 1,880 cases in 2002. The expansion of markets and price acceleration have contributed an important boost for the development of illegal wildlife trade that was identified as the most important factor contributing to the significant depletion of populations of some species such as cats, bears, pangolins, amphibians, reptiles, orchids, agarwood and some other endemic plants. The quantity of wildlife provided for the Vietnam markets is estimated at about 3,400 tons and over 1 million heads per year.

Japan appears frequently on the top three list of importing countries in endangered species with official permission under the regulation of CITES. Japan is a major importer of live reptiles, mostly tortoises and freshwater turtles, but also Mississippi AlligatorReticulated Python and Nile Crocodile, although export of these species is restricted in the countries of origin, or species are listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In August 2010, a notorious Malaysian wildlife trader has been arrested after having tried to smuggle about 100 live snakes to Indonesia. Since the early 1980s, he legally wholesaled tens of thousands of wild reptiles annually, many of which were on sale in American pet stores. But he allegedly commanded one of the world’s largest wildlife trafficking syndicates, and using a private zoo as a cover, also offered a large array of contraband, including snow leopardpelts, panda bear skins, rhino horns, rare birds, and Komodo dragonschinchillas, elephants, gorillastigers, and smuggled critically endangered wildlife from Australia, China, MadagascarNew Zealand, South America to markets largely in Europe, Japan, and the United States.

As the perspective in North and South America, The USA is the second largest importer of wildlife products and a large destination for the illegal pet trade. Every month, many tons of bushmeat arrives from Africa. During 2001–2005, over 11,000 specimens, i.e. live animals and wildlife products of birdsreptilesmarine turtlescorals and mammals were seized in shipments from Costa RicaDominican RepublicEl SalvadorGuatemalaHonduras and Nicaragua.  Amazon rainforest animals are smuggled across borders the same way illegal drugs are — in the trunks of cars, in suitcases, in crates disguised as something else. In August 2011, a couple was arrested when they tried to smuggle jaguar pelts into the U.S. from Mexico. The two had made repeated trips to Florida and had offered to sell the skins to customers in Texas and Florida or through Internet sites. Both face up to five years in prison and criminal fines of up to $250,000 each.

Animal trading in Latin America is widespread as well. In open air Amazon markets in Iquitos and Manaus, a variety of rainforest wildlife is sold openly as meat, such as agoutispeccaries, turtles, turtle eggs, walking catfish, and others. In addition, many species are sold as pets. The keeping of parrots and monkeys as pets by villagers along the Amazon is commonplace. But the sale of these “companion” animals in open markets is rampant. Capturing baby tamarins,marmosetsspider monkeyssaki monkeys, and other species in order to sell them, often requires shooting the mother primate out of a treetop with her clinging child; the youngster may or may not survive the fall. With the human population increasing, such practices have a serious impact on the future prospects for many threatened species.

An Indian rhino calf that lost its mother to poachers earlier this week is clinging to life with the help of conservationists, according to WWF staff assisting with its care. The 2-week-old calf is in critical condition after poachers gunned down its mother and chopped off her horn on April 2. WWF celebrated the arrival of two calves—one from the poached rhino and one from another translocated rhino—just last week. The disturbing incident marks the latest in a surge of poaching plaguing India’s Assam state, where 16 greater one-horned rhinos have been killed already  this year. A team of frontline staff from WWF, the government, partner organizations and community members located the dehydrated and traumatized calf and brought the newborn to a safe location for urgent veterinary care.“It was a challenge getting hold of the calf as it was very scared, but thankfully it is fine and doing well now,” WWF’s Deba Dutta, a member of the rescue team, said.

Still, no one can assure the survival of the calf; newborns are highly dependent on their mothers for the first few years of life. Involved parties will set up a special fenced enclosure, or boma, for the calf so that rehabilitation experts can raise it. Though challenging, successfully reintroducing rhinos into the wild is possible. Poachers and criminal traffickers are decimating the rhino population across their Asian and African ranges at record rates. Killing has surged in recent years as the rhino horn has become a prized commodity in Vietnam, where it is marketed as a miracle cure for everything from cancer to hangovers. Vietnam has done little to crackdown on the illegal trade or curb demand by dispelling the rumors, which lack medical basis.

Criminals are now targeting rhinos reintroduced into Manas National Park by WWF and its Indian Rhino Vision 2020 partners. Four of the 18 translocated rhinos have been killed for their horns. “In Manas National Park itself, monitoring, patrolling, intelligence and protection regimes need to be strengthened and implemented on the ground in a time-bound, verifiable and accountable manner,” Dr. Dipankar Ghose, director of WWF-India’s Species and Landscapes Program, said.

The best hope for slowing the illegal wildlife trade may well be in Asia, through convincing young Chinese or Thais that their demand for animal products is leading directly to the extinction of endangered species. There’s some hope — over the weekend Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra vowed for the first time to work toward ending her country’s trade in ivory. The looming threat of sanctions probably helped and China has made moves to limit shark-fin soup, which may help reduce the appalling numbers of sharks killed each year by humans. But we need to do much, much more. And until we do, we’ll still have blood on our hands.

When we try and look around for instances of wildlife trade, we would be astonished to see so many rare plants and animals are out in the market for sale. What should we do then?.We must understand and curb the ways in which we are contributing to this menace. It takes a lot of undoing and unlearning, but we should. Stop buying wildlife and wildlife parts. If there are no buyers, sellers will not exist. When there are no sellers, hunters and poachers will be unheard of. We must extend our support to the individuals and organisations who champion the cause of the protecting the wildlife. We cannot treat it as no-body’s business. Loss of wildlife is our cumulative loss. Education is the key. We must inspire and educate people as much as we can. This is the need of the hour. As long as there is real education, there is hope. We must report any instance of illegal trade that we come across. We must sensitize our children to wildlife and tell them of the damage we can cause because of carelessness.

Moving forward, we all have a lot of responsibility on our shoulders. Our wildlife and ecosystems are unimaginably delicate. A small unintentional damage can spell disaster to its fragile linkages. We must realize that these ecosystems have sustained mankind for so long. And now, these ecosystems need to be preserved to help life sustain on this planet.

Today we may not realize the impact of what we lose everyday. The perils of wildlife trade will not be immediately obvious to all. As we go along in time, we will find our existence challenged and daily life increasingly strained. We shall find birds migrating during wrong seasons and giving birth on wrong calendar months only to find their offspring’s dead due to harsh climate. Water will become scarce and nations will fight over it. Food will no longer be in the form we relish and enjoy. New incurable diseases of mind and body will spring up from nowhere. As we realize the future we are arriving at, it is quite undesirable, already.

It seems highly farfetched that wildlife trade can determine the course of future and ensure life on planet earth. But it is true. We now stand at a critical point in history of time where we determine how the future will be for ourselves and for our children. The Earth has always provided for us. It is our turn to give it back – the protection, care, healing, nourishment and love. We are the new custodians of our Earth. This is our sacred pact with life.

REFERENCES

INTERNET

 

BOOKS

  • ‘Tiger Bone & Rhino Horn’ The Destruction of Wildlife for Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • ‘Black Market’ Inside the Endangered Species Trade in Asia
  • ‘The Lizard King’ The True Crimes and Passions of the World’s Greatest Reptile Smugglers

 

 

IN THIRD PLACE IS MUHAMMAD SYAFIQ BIN MAIDIN FROM SEKOLAH BERASRAMA PENUH INTEGRASI BATU RAKIT, TERENGGANU, MALAYSIA.

SUMMARY

Today we may not realize the impact of what we lose every day. The perils of wildlife trade will not be immediately obvious to all. Loss of wildlife is our cumulative loss. The illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to the survival of some of the world’s rarest species. In fact it’s second only to habitat destruction as a cause of species loss and potential extinction. Wildlife trafficking is driven by organized groups who exploit natural resources and endanger threatened species and ecosystems in contravention of CITES. This essay is to sensitize our people the evils of the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts. I use some of modern research and investigation to proof out this essay. Moving forward, we all have a lot of responsibility on our shoulders. And now, these ecosystems need to be preserved to help life sustain on this planet. The Earth has always provided for us. It is our turn to give it back – the protection, care, healing, nourishment and love.

It seems more people have acquired a wildlife parts than ever before. The illegal trade in these endangered species is on the increase. Many people buy wildlife parts thinking they are helping it, or not even knowing what it is.

Hunting for the illegal wildlife trade has the greatest potential to do maximum harm in minimal time, and is a serious threat to a number of endangered and vulnerable species. Illegal wildlife trade and contraband includes live pets, hunting trophies, fashion accessories, cultural artifacts, ingredients for traditional medicines, and wild meat for human consumption.

Illegal wildlife trade is broadly defined as an environmental crime, which directly harms the environment. Wildlife trafficking is driven by organized groups who exploit natural resources and endanger threatened species and ecosystems. Environmental crimes by their very nature are trans-boundary, using porous borders, and involve cross-border criminal syndicates characterized by irregular migration, money laundering, corruption and the exploitation of disadvantaged communities.

The links between wealth, poverty and engagement in the wildlife trade are complex: people involved in the trade are not necessarily poor, and the poor who are involved do not capture the majority of the trade’s monetary value. In 2002, the illegal wildlife trade was estimated it to be the second largest illegal trade, second only to the drugs trade, with a value of at least £10 billion. In 2008, it was estimated that it is worth at least US$5 billion, and may potentially total in excess of $20 billion annually. This ranks the illegal wildlife trade as among the most lucrative illicit economies in the world, behind illegal drugs and possibly human trafficking and arms trafficking. Due to its clandestine nature, the illegal trade is difficult to quantify with any accuracy. Potential areas of market growth include the Internet, where traders use chat rooms and auction websites to engage in illicit wildlife sales.

A substantial portion of the global illegal wildlife trade — possibly the largest in the world — takes place in Asia, where demand is driven by the need for specific animal parts to practice traditional Asian medicine, for human consumption, and as symbols of wealth. Demand for illegal wildlife is reportedly increasing in Southeast Asia due in part to the region’s economic boom and resulting affluence. Southeast Asia is also a key supplier of wildlife products to the world.

Live animals and animal parts such as tortoises, fresh water turtles, snakes, sharks, pangolins and monitor lizards are sold in open-air markets and end up as pets, trophies, or in specialty restaurants that feature wildlife as gourmet dining.

Japan appears frequently on the top three list of importing countries in endangered species with official permission under the regulation of CITES. Japan is major importer of live reptiles, mostly tortoises and freshwater turtles, but also Mississippi Alligator, Reticulated Python and Nile crocodile, although export of these species is restricted in the countries of origin, or species are listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In August 2010, a notorious Malaysian wildlife trader has been arrested after having tried to smuggle about 100 live snakes to Indonesia. Since the early 1980s, he legally wholesaled tens of thousands of wild reptiles annually, many of which were on sale in American pet stores. But he allegedly commanded one of the world’s largest wildlife trafficking syndicates, and using a private zoo as a cover, also offered a large array of contraband, including snow leopard pelts, panda bear skins, rhino horns, rare birds, and Komodo dragons, chinchillas, elephants, gorillas, tigers, and smuggled critically endangered wildlife from Australia, China, Madagascar, New Zealand, South America to markets largely in Europe, Japan, and the United States.

China is the world’s largest importer of wildlife products, including an insatiable demand for turtles, ivory, tigers, pangolins, and many other species used for food or medicine. India and Nepal feature as source and transit for the trade in body parts of tigers, rhinos, leopards, snow leopards, otters and musk deer for usages in traditional Chinese medicine, and for decorative use by the neo rich. Traders use land-routes via Sikkim, Ladakh and Tibet as borders are porous and customs lax. Skins and body parts of 783 tigers, 2766 leopards, and 777 otters were seized between 1994 to August 2006 in India alone, probably representing a tiny fraction of the actual trade bound for Tibet and China. Among the many seizures of live and dead pangolins in Southeast Asian countries, these were the largest ready for export to China: in spring 2008, two shipments containing about 23 t of dead pangolins and scales were discovered in Vietnam originating in Indonesia; in July 2008, some 14 t of frozen Malayan pangolins and about 50 kg of scales were seized in Sumatra.

Animal trading in Latin America is widespread as well. In open air Amazon markets in Iquitos and Manaus, a variety of rainforest wildlife is sold openly as meat, such as agouistis, peccaries, turtles, turtle’s eggs, walking catfish, and others. In addition, many species are sold as pets. The keeping of parrots and monkeys as pets by villagers along the Amazon is commonplace. But the sale of these “companion” animals in open markets is rampant. Capturing baby tamarins, marmosets, spider monkeys, saki monkeys, and other species in order to sell them, often requires shooting the mother primate out of a treetop with her clinging child; the youngster may or may not survive the fall. With the human population increasing, such practices have a serious impact on the future prospects for many threatened species.

In Thailand, the Chatuchak weekend market in Bangkok is an important hub for the sale of freshwater turtles and tortoises for pets. People from Japan, Malaysia and Singapore are known to purchase large numbers of turtles from the dealers for retail in their respective countries. The majority of the illegally sourced species observed during surveys carried out in 2006 and 2007, or confiscated in recent years were not native to Thailand, but originated in Indonesia, Indochina, Madagascar, Congo, Uganda, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Barbados, and Venezuela. The illegal trade in live elephants and ivory still flourishes. Seizures in Asia and Africa in recent years appear to have severely reduced the availability of African raw ivory, and prices increased on average over 300% since 2001. However, Thailand still has one of the largest and most active ivory industries seen anywhere in the world. Every year, many elephants are illegally imported from Myanmar for use in the tourism industry; elephant calves are slated for begging on the streets. The sale of lizards, primates, cats and other endangered species has been widely documented. The Suvarnabhumi International Airport offers smugglers direct jet service to Europe, the Middle East, North America and Africa. Trade routes connecting in Southeast Asia link to the United States for the sale of turtles, lemurs, and other primates, Cambodia to Japan for the sale of slow lorises as pets, and the sale of many species to China.

In Vietnam, 14,758 cases involving wildlife hunting and trade violations were identified and prosecuted from 1996 to March 2007, and about 635 tons of wildlife with a total of 181,670 individual animals was confiscated. The data showed an increasing trend in the number of wildlife violations, from 1,469 cases in 2000 to 1,880 cases in 2002. The expansion of markets and price acceleration have contributed an important boost for the development of illegal wildlife trade that was identified as the most important factor contributing to the significant depletion of populations of some species such as cats, bears, pangolins, amphibians, reptiles, orchids, agar wood and some other endemic plants. The quantity of wildlife provided for the Vietnam markets is estimated at about 3,400 tons and over 1 million heads per year.

In August 2010, a notorious Malaysian wildlife trader has been arrested after having tried to smuggle about 100 live snakes to Indonesia. Since the early 1980s, he legally wholesaled tens of thousands of wild reptiles annually, many of which were on sale in American pet stores. But he allegedly commanded one of the world’s largest wildlife trafficking syndicates, and using a private zoo as a cover, also offered a large array of contraband, including snow leopard pelts, panda bear skins, rhino horns, rare birds, and Komodo dragons, chinchillas, elephants, gorillas, tigers, and smuggled critically endangered wildlife from Australia, China, Madagascar, New Zealand, South America to markets largely in Europe, Japan, and the United States.

Indonesia has more unique species of mammals, birds, and butterflies than any other country in the world. This diversity has made it a hot-spot for illegal wildlife trafficking, which loses the country an estimated 70 million, dollars a year. The further Indonesia’s exotic species are removed from their habitat, the more valuable they become. An orang utan for example, which is only found on two islands in the world, can be purchased for five dollars in Borneo, but can sell over 10 000 dollars once it leaves the country. Until now, the weak threat of law enforcement has done little to deter traffickers from the lure of these high profits. Even through endangered species are sold in broad daylight at Jakarta’s animal markets, arrests are infrequent. But a pair of recent prosecutions could be a sign that Indonesian is stepping up their fight against illegal animal trafficking.

The threat of wildlife trafficking is on my mind, as the biennial meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) continues over the next two weeks in Bangkok. Born 40 years ago, CITES sets the global controls for trade in wildlife, with a focus — at its best — of slowing the slaughter and trafficking of endangered species. For years there was real progress being made in the field. After low points during the 1980s, nations under CITES began to successfully crack down on the illicit ivory trade, which drove the wide-scale poaching of rhinos and elephants in Africa. Between 1973 and 2012, the population of the white rhino in Africa rose from 2,000 to over 19,000 and other endangered species made comebacks, thanks to international sanctions on ivory trade and tougher prosecution on the ground in Africa.

But those advances — and the endangered species — are at risk. Last year poaching levels in Africa were at their highest since international monitors began keeping detailed records in 2002. In 2011 a record amount of illegal ivory was seized worldwide: 38.8 tons, equal to the tusks that would be found on more than 4,000 dead elephants. According to CITES’ own numbers, an estimated 25,000 elephants were poached across Africa in 2011, and in South Africa alone 668 rhinos were killed by poachers last year. And the wildlife trade is having a serious impact on biodiversity as well. According to a new study published in the open journal PLOS ONE, in central Africa an astounding 62% of all forest elephants — slightly smaller than the better-known African savannah elephant — have been killed for their ivory over the past decade. “The analysis confirms what conservationists have feared: the rapid trend toward extinction — potentially within the next decade — of the forest elephant,” Samantha Strindberg of the Wildlife Conservation Society, one of the lead authors of the PLOS ONE study, said in a statement. The forest elephant — and other species — are being hunted to death.

The resurgence of poaching is driven by two connected factors. One is the tremendous increase in the demand for ivory and other animal’s products, especially in Asia and particularly in China. That demand isn’t new — ivory has long been used in Asia for art and in traditional medicine. In Vietnam, for instance, ground rhino horn has become popular as a cure in cancer. What’s changed, though, is economic growth — more money in places like China mean more consumers willing to spend more money to buy ivory in all its forms.

That makes ivory all the more valuable, and when an interdicted product — like illegal drugs — becomes more valuable, criminal gangs get very interested. That is what’s happened with poaching, as Africa-based, Asian-run crime syndicates get into the wildlife-trafficking business. It’s perfect from their perspective — wildlife trafficking still has a low risk of detection and persecution, and what penalties do exist tend to be much lighter than those that accompany drug convictions. Wildlife officers in African countries are poor and outgunned, which makes them that much easier to bribe or, in some sad cases, simply kill. That sharp increase in ivory seizures in recent years is a sign of just how involved big gangs are getting in the trade — only professional criminals with continent-spanning networks could move hundreds of pounds of tusks at a time.

The world is dealing with an unprecedented spike in illegal wildlife trade, threatening to overturn decades of conservation gains. Ivory estimated to weigh more than 23 metric tons-a figure that represents 2,500 elephants-was seized in the 13 largest seizures of illegal ivory in 2001. Poaching threatens the last of our wild tigers that number as few as 3200. Wildlife crime is a big business. Run by dangerous international networks, wildlife and animal parts are trafficked much like illegal drugs and arms. By its very nature, it is almost impossible to obtain reliable figures for the value of illegal wildlife trade. Experts at TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, estimate that it runs into hundreds of millions of dollars.

An Indian rhino calf that lost its mother to poachers earlier this week is clinging to life with the help of conservations, according to WWF staff assisting with its care. The 2-week–old calf is in critical condition after poachers gunned down its mother and chopped off her horn on April 2. WWF celebrated the arrival of two calves-one from the poached rhino and one from another trans located rhino-just last week. The disturbing incident marks the latest in a surge of poaching plaguing India’s Assam state, where 16 greater one-horned rhinos have been killed already this year. A team of frontline staff from WWF, the government, partner organizations and community members located the dehydrated and traumatized calf and brought the newborn to a safe location for urgent veterinary care.

The very sad and unforgettable phenomenon occurs widely had brings many disadvantage for the nation’s development. It will cause a totally bad side effect to our country. So it must be ban immediately.

From my perception of the situation globally, I thinks it must be stopped immediately. In case of increasing the number of extinct rare animals, we must stop it at once. There are no benefits at all of transporting animals from one country to one country and then sell it to other pet enthusiasts worldwide. It not just kills the species of certain species, but it also increase the number of extinct animals. Why? When someone deals with wildlife parts, it will take a lot of animals with them. It will reduce the numbers of certain species and that’s how the methodology of why certain species in Malaysia disappearing just like that every year.

Animals provide the material basis of human life includes food, clothing and fuel, nutrition, or warmth and artificial light, and for the maintenance of health and general well-being. So, if we kill them, how come we can achieve these basic needs of our life? We must think wisely. Thus I am really sure that illegal trade in wildlife is one of the source of torturing animals and does not make sense. It must be banned!

As we can see, animals too bring luck to people. They act as maintenance agents. They help in maintaining the ecosystem of our earth. For example, common animals like fish, chicken and goat are benefits for them supply nutrition for the humans. Without them, we cannot survive until today. Animals like Huber, Chanukah, Loris are some of the rare and exotic species that turns good to people. Without hurting them, we can use them as an attraction to our country instead. If we place them in a suitable place like a sanctuary, people out there especially the tourists will come and take this granted chance to come and pursue a closer look of what exactly and how is the animals’ life.

Animals been tortured widely, animals been killed largely, animals has no value of life. Is it true? Of course not, animals are also creature; they want to live, just like us. But, the modern lifestyle had brought them to their doom. I dislike this phenomenon. They must be given a chance to live, to proof that they have their own commercial value and can help people in our daily life. So, my perception, it is really a bad habit to be display to other people out there, as we must conserve our country’s name from a nasty lie.

That’s why I am standing with my point that illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts in a global perspective should be banned.

If there is a mistake, it also must be a solution. With the rises of this illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts, the government had taken some efforts to instill love and respect of the rights of wildlife. Many series of activities had been done throughout the world by the government, non-governmental organizations and the people. It helps many endangered species and brings out them to their life.

Public education and awareness is often cited as an important issue in the conservation of endangered species. The Malaysian public is quite well-informed of the status of marine turtles in the country as the local media has provided ample coverage. Other activities such as long-term turtle volunteer programs, turtle camps and other awareness programs conducted by the Fisheries Department, World Wide Fund Malaysia and SEATRU, KUSTEM have helped increase public awareness on marine turtles. However, awareness of the plight of tortoises and freshwater turtles is almost non-existent. Some of these species have been traditionally served in Chinese restaurants as exotic soups. In order to halt the trade, education as well as appropriate legislation is necessary.

At the regional level, some initiatives have been made to develop regional marine conservation programs. The turtle islands heritage protected area (TIHPA), a trans boundary protected area in the Sulu Sea was established in 1996 between Sabah and the Philippines to manage jointly the large marine turtle populations occurring there.  The MoU on ASEAN Sea Turtle Conservation and Protection was signed in 1997 while the MoU on the conservation and management of marine turtles and their habitats of the Indian ocean and southeast Asia was concluded in 2001. Malaysia has yet to ratify the latter.

At the global level, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), to which Malaysia is party, serves to curb international trade of marine turtles and their parts. Other conventions like the convention on biological diversity and convention on wetlands of international importance Especially as Waterfowl Habitat that have been ratified by Malaysia promote conservation of wild animals and plants that included turtles.

Turtle sanctuaries have been established at some key nesting locations. In order to secure all nesting sites of significance and to prevent them from further degradation, more sanctuaries should be established at the specialized locations. It helps to reduce some of the turtle’s extinction issues.

At the same time, there are also practical solutions that can be done by the people that can curb this trade and eventually bring it to an end. I suggest that the best hope to slowing the illegal wildlife trade may well be in Asia, through convincing young Chinese or Thais that their demand for animal products is leading directly to the extinction of endangered species. There’s some hope- over the weekend Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra vowed for the first time to work toward ending her country’s trade in ivory. The looming threat of sanctions probably helped and China has made moves to limit shark-fin soup, which may help to reduce the appalling numbers of sharks killed each year by humans. But we need to do much, much more. And until we do, we’ll still have blood on our hands.

Next, loss of wildlife is our cumulative loss. Education is the key. We must inspire and educate people as much as we can. This is the need of the hour. As long as there is real education, there is hope. We must report any instance of illegal trade that we come across. We must sensitize our children to wildlife and tell them of the damage we can cause because of carelessness.

When we try and look around for instances of wildlife trade, we would be astonished to see many rare plants and animals are out in the market for sale. What we should we do then? We must understand and curb the ways in which we are contributing to this menace. It takes a lot of undoing and unlearning, but we should do. Stop buying wildlife and wildlife parts. If there are no buyers, sellers will not exist. When there are no sellers, hunters and poachers will be unheard of. We must extend our support to the individuals and organizations who champion the cause of the protecting the wildlife. We cannot treat it as no-body’s business.

For poaching to be curbed those resources must be targeted at the whole trafficking chain. We cannot just focus on poachers. We also have to deal with middle men working in transit countries, and people distributing and selling the merchandise in market countries. We have to deal with people who are financing these operations. But it is not an easy task, with corruption lubricating the movement of illicit wildlife — often destined for Asia as delicacies or use in traditional medicines.

It is time to treat wildlife crime as serious crime and to deploy the techniques used to combat illicit trade in narcotics, such as undercover operations and “controlled deliveries” – meaning contraband is not seized but tracked to its destination. This will enable the masterminds in this illegal trade to be identified, prosecuted and convicted. Bringing this destructive activity to an end will require harsh penalties, including making sure these criminals do not profit from their crimes. These enforcement measures need to be coupled with well-targeted public awareness campaigns to help suppress demand for illegal goods.

Moving forward, we all have a lot of responsibility on our shoulders. Our wildlife and ecosystems are unimaginably delicate. A small unintentional damage can spell disaster to its fragile linkages. We must realize that these ecosystems have sustained mankind for so long. And now, these ecosystems need to be preserved to help life sustain on this planet.

It seems highly farfetched that wildlife trade can determine the course of future and ensure life on planet earth.  But it is true. We now stand at a critical point in history of time where we determine how the future will be for ourselves and for our children. The Earth has always provided for us. It is our turn to give it back – the protection, care, healing, nourishment and love. We are the new custodians of our Earth. This is our sacred pact with life.

Today we may not realize the impact of what we lose every day. The perils of wildlife trade will not be immediately obvious to all. As we go along in time, we will find our existence challenged and daily life increasingly strained. We shall find birds migrating during wrong seasons and giving birth on wrong calendar months only to find their offspring’s dead due to harsh climate. Water will become scarce and nations will fight over it. Food will no longer be in the form we relish and enjoy. New incurable diseases of mind and body will spring up from nowhere. As we realize the future we arriving at, it is quite undesirable, already.

In a nutshell, illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to the survival of some of the world’s rarest species. We’re killers of those other species of life that share this planet with us.  Some examples of illegal wildlife trade are well known such as poaching of elephants for ivory and tigers for their skins and bones. Wildlife trafficking is driven by organized groups who exploit natural resources and endanger threatened species and ecosystems in contravention of CITES. The authorities have taken many ways to prevent this crime by setting up a series of protected parks; areas that are particularly threatening are called “wildlife trade hotspots” and enforce the law so that the guilty will get pay for their crime. We must stop this illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts to ensure the equilibrium of the nature and the development of the country. No illegal trade, no endangered species. No illegal selling, no extinct animals.

 

REFERENCES

INTERNET

 

BOOKS

  • ‘Tiger Bone & Rhino Horn’ The Destruction of Wildlife for Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • ‘Black Market’ Inside the Endangered Species Trade in Asia
  • ‘The Lizard King’ The True Crimes and Passions of the World’s Greatest Reptile Smuggler
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The Top Three Poems

POETRY  SECTION

THE WINNING POEM, THE HUNTER HUNTED BY LIM LI ANN OF SEKOLAH MENENGAH SRI KDU, KOYA DAMANSARA, KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA.

Trees and shrubs pass by in a blur,
As it races towards a distant safety,
One injured paw in front of another,
The tiger stirs up the foliage,
As its lithe body bounds through the forest
Swift and agile; a sight to behold,
In a haze, of fluid motion and bold colours.

But a few paces away, a dusty FWD vehicle trails,
Bumping and bouncing as excited poachers await
A good shot; After years of practice, they won’t fail;
They know that exhausted prey are easy prey.

Deep wounds on its paw as it slows its pace,
Foot prints of blood left on the ground,
Shots heard as the tiger attempts to escape,
The hunter now the hunted.
For this magnificent animal, this is the danger it faces :-
A slow and painful death.

Sought for its valuable coat and bones,
Booming demands have driven the tigers
To dwindling numbers.
Out of nine, six subspecies alone
Remain.

The symbol of bravery, grandeur and strength
Forced to critical endangerment.
Their blood on the hands of man
As the tigers face this predicament.
Stop the buying of these products,
Hold awareness campaigns,
Because when the buying halts,
So will end the act, of poaching.

Fund the rescue of these tigers,
Have rehabilitation programs,
Give this protected species,
The much needed helping hand.

What sets Man apart from other creatures?
Our intelligence? Curiosity for the unknown?
I believe it is our principles and compassion,
The choice to save a species not our own.

Things of this world,
Once lost, cannot be regained,
But our actions, our deeds will forever remain.
The fate of the tigers lies in our hands,
Stop illegal poaching!

 

IN SECOND PLACE IS AMMAR HAZIQ BIN HISHAMUDDIN OF SEKOLAH MENENGAH SAINS MUAR, JOHOR, MALAYSIA.

Birds soaring in the mighty sky,
While rhinos charging through the vast land,
Even the little fish,
Swims majestically beneath the mirror of a crystal lake,
This was just once,

A bedtime story,
Told to the young,
Of the life outside these sheer walls.

A piercing roar,
Trembles the earth,
Furs and hairs,
Stood up on every creatures’ neck,
A drip of blood,
Wet the unstained earth,
And a thousand cries can be heard,
Triggering the sea of death,
By the river,
A carcass once full of life,
Laying naked,
As its skin was stripped till its core.

Outside the skirts of wildlife,
Where skyscrapers rise and bore the sky,
Behind the grand doors,
Amass a thousand lost souls of the wild,
The clock ticks as time passed by,
Beneath the curtains of shadows,
A new world of the loss,
Lays hidden,
Selling the potions of the dead,
Migrating over the seven seas,
Beneath far below the ship’s deck,
Countless of beast resting,
Waiting for their new fate.

A gentle breeze,
Becoming one with the soul,
Of the last breath,
Of a dying beast,
As the sun sets on the horizon,
Heaps of corpses,
Slump down to an endless sleep,
Laying there as lifeless as a stone,
Twilight comes to mark a new day,
The sound of hooves and paws,
Thudding on solid dirt,
Lessen,
As it shows the beginning of an end.

Their eyes were concealed in a thick fog,
For those who wields their hands with arms,
For they can no longer see,
The extinction of life,
Familiar faces,
That once walked among us,
Are now forever erased,
In the history of Terra Firma,
As reality becomes history,
Life becomes death,
Fog once concealed mankind,
Disperse,
And the truth revealed.

Time is gold,
And never reversed,
The soulless life stays still,
As nature has spoken,
Seeking the world,
For a better life.

 

 

IN THIRD PLACE IS FROM A CUB LIVING IN ASIA BY SHABBIR HASHIM FROM BEACON HOUSE SCHOOL SYSTEM, LAHORE, PAKISTAN

I reside in fear, I breath smoke, I see injustice, I bear the dismay,
Shattered, crippled and trampled, cub’s innocent dreams lay.
Wings fluttering by my sides, as if an angel is about to fly,
Let’s see where thoughts take me, well above me is just a gloomy sky.

The bitterness of this freezing, cold, bleak, reality tears me apart.
Desiring to speak my heart out, I just wonder from where to start.
With death lurking in this heartless jungle, summer’s warmth faded away
Leaving behind a witness to remind that once wild existed in a heyday,

With, calm descending, peace resided and love nested in this shire,
Suddenly, coin flipped. The scene changed. Like an open fire;
Now, the serenity gone, death lurks in the woods like a screechy cry!
Wounded with the deadly bullet of the hunter, can’t move even if I try.

A bleak night and gradually the glimmering stars fade away,
In the dark, they shot me, no matter come what may
Time froze, stillness prevailed, nothing moved, nothing even dared
Legal authorities were not informed, as if they cared

Taken away, across the borders, to a new place,
A new life, new situations, all of sudden in my face,
In a tussle, a struggle, to fight the way to adapt the conditions
Finally, I gave up, for I had no motivation, as well as no reasons

The caretakers, power retainers, not informed or were gone?
Master of their art, perhaps bribed, were surprisingly not even known.

Twinkle; twinkle, little star. How, I wonder what you are.
Up above the lifeless world so high,
Like a glittering and sparkling, welled up dead eye
Alas, for me there are no diamonds in the sky

Now educated, someone will rescue others, in the brink of time
Or let the hunters win, after all its all about that shinny dime
Loaded with guns, lethal weapons, wagging like a storm
When all of us dead, whom will they hunt? Where they from?

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News

Due to overwhelming response we were unable to announce the names of all those who had qualified for the finals in both categories on 15 September 2013.. The results of all the 10 prize winners in each category will be announced on Tuesday, 22 October, 2013. The Closing and Prize Giving ceremony has been postponed from 24 October 2013 to 30 October 2013.

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ASiS International Essay and Poetry Writing Competition

AIWC 2013

The Organiser :
SM Sains Alam Shah  (Alam Shah Science School), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (ASiS).

Theme :
The Evils of the Illegal Trade in Wildlife and Wildlife Parts: A Global Perspective

 

Topic for the Essay Writing Section :
The illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts has had very serious repurcussions on many species of wildlife worldwide, paving the way for many of  them to be pushed to  the brink of extinction.  Discuss this statement in the light of what is taking place today to a certain species or a number of different species. Discuss the roles of legislators, law enforcement agencies, non-governmental organizations and educational establishments to fight this menace. At the same suggest practical solutions that can curb this trade and eventually bring it to an end.

 

Topic for the Poetry Writing Section:
Write a poem reflecting the plight of one or more species of wildlife as a result of the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts. See format, rules, and regulations below.

 

Calendar 2013

14 March 2013                                        – Launch of the Essay and Poetry Writing Competition

14 March – 30 June 2013                         – The duration of the competition

30 June 2013                                           – Deadline for submissions.

01 July – 14 September 2013                  –  Processing of all entries

15 September 2013                                  – The 50 shortlisted participants from each category will be announced on the website

15 September – 14 October 2013            –  Judging the final entries from each category.

25 October 2013                                      – The top three award winning entries and the next seven  best entries (consolation) for both the essay and poetry writing categories will be announced on the website.

24 October 2013                                        – Closing and Prize Giving.

 

The trade in wildlife and wildlife parts
Man has always been a greedy being – never satisfied with whatever wealth he has – always wanting more. He goes all out through every extent available, just to make that extra dollar. As a consequence he not only puts himself in peril, but the  other inhabitants of this beautiful planet as well, The feeling of greed knows no bounds – millions and millions of hectares of rainforest have been lost throughout the years, driving many species of plants and animals to extinction. Many plants and animals too have been collected and trapped to be sold to rare plant collectors and pet enthusiasts worldwide. This has resulted in many species becoming extinct or being pushed to the brink of extinction. A case in point here is the Bali Starling, a bird endemic to the island of Bali in Indonesia. Primates and other mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians too have been extensively trapped for the exotic food industry.  The craving for wildlife parts as a status symbol, and also as supposed cures for ailments have resulted in a global demand for wildlife parts. Tigers have been killed for their skin and bones, bears for their gall bladders, elephants for their tusks, and rhinoceroses for their horns. All five species of rhinoceros (2 in Africa and 3 in Asia) are endangered, 3 of them critically because of hunting pressure in much reduced habitats, resulting in small non viable breeding populations. The elephant too (2 in Africa and 1 in Asia) is also a target for poachers who are involved in the billion dollar ivory trade and all that we see today are very much reduced populations of formerly extensive herds. The tiger too is fast disappearing from Asia, even in protected areas, because of a high demand for its body parts. Even rare orchids and pitcher plants too are not spared. The illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts is very big business like the drug trade. The player at the bottom of the pyramid, the poacher, actually takes a very small share of the proceeds while the players at the apex, the dealers, make very big fortunes. The latter is very rich and in many countries throughout the world, has corrupt legislators, ministers, and law enforcement agencies on his payroll. These corrupt officials have facilitated this evil trade by choosing to ignore crimes committed and being in cahoots with the wildlife parts trader. As responsible citizens, students can play a big role to stop this evil trade and it is the duty of every citizen of a nation to do so. A nation’s progress or failure rests to a great extent on the integrity of her citizens. Say no to the trade in wildlife and wildlife parts. Love Life Love Nature.

The ASiS International Essay and Poetry Writing Competition 2013 (AIWC) would like to hear the views of school students worldwide on the efforts undertaken to curb the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts. In this respect, prospective participants of the essay writing section are required to:

  1. Give a clear cut definition of the issue at hand.
  2. Give your perceptions of the situation globally or in your respective countries.
  3. Outline the roles of the government, non-governmental organizations, and the people in efforts to instil love and respect of the rights of wildlife.
  4. Focus on one or more programmes in your country to instil awareness on the conservation of wildlife and nature.

 

Questions to address in your essay.

  1. How have current efforts in your country to curb the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts helped in preserving endangered species of wildlife?
  2. How do you perceive the long term benefits the curbing of illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts to your country and the world at large?
  3. What concrete actions would you recommend to ensure the continued monitoring of the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts by your country?

 

No definitions or questions to address are required in the poetry section.

 

We encourage you to draw on your personal experiences when possible and focus on providing your own creative solutions to ensure the inculcation of moral values among the citizens of your country and its efforts to put a stop to the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts, both in prose and poetry forms.

 

General

All work must be submitted by individuals, group work is not allowed.

One participant may submit only one work.

All submissions must be submitted together with the official entry form which will be available online.

 

Format, rules and regulations.

 

A. Essay Writing Section

Your essay must be at least 4000 words.

Essays are accepted only on MS Word Document, using Arial, font size 12.

Submissions will be accepted until 30 June 2013.

This essay competition is open for school students only from ALL countries of the world. Participants must be between the ages of 15-18 on 30 June 2013.

All essays must be in English.

Submissions must be sent via email to aiwc2013@asiskl.org and must be together with the official entry form (AIWC -2013 – PARTICIPATION). Please also include your postal / mailing address.

Please fill in your name in the official entry form only. Do not include your name in the body of the essay.

Participants must provide the names and websites of their respective schools when submitting their entries.

Each essay must be accompanied by a short summary (maximum 200 words).  The summary will be used by the jury to make a pre-selection.

Quotes and references must be clearly marked throughout the essay and properly cited.

All references used must be systematically listed at the end of the essay.

All submissions must be original. No previously published material will be accepted. Any form of plagiarism will result in automatic disqualification.

The Organizer reserves the right to publish and / to make available to the public the winning submissions.

The decision of the jury is final and is not subject to an appeal.

 

Poetry Writing Section

Your poem can be in any form but must have a minimum of 30 lines.

Poems are accepted only on MS Word Document, using Arial, font size 12.

Submissions will be accepted until 30 June 2013.

This essay and poetry writing competition is open for school students only from ALL countries of the world. Participants must be between the ages of 15-18 on 30 June 2013.

All poems must be in English.

Submissions must be sent via email to aiwc2013@asiskl.org and must be together with the official entry form (AIWC -2013 – PARTICIPATION). Please also include your postal / mailing address.

Please fill in your name in the official entry form only. Do not include your name in the body of the poem.

Participants must provide the names and websites of their respective schools when submitting their entries.

All submissions must be original. No previously published material will be accepted. Any form of plagiarism will result in automatic disqualification.

The Organizer reserves the right to publish and / to make available to the public the winning submissions.

The decision of the jury is final and is not subject to an appeal.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is the deadline for submissions? The deadline for submissions is 30 June 2013. Work submitted after the deadline will not be considered.
  2. How do I submit? The submission process is very simple. Essays and poems must be submitted on MS Word (Arial, font size 12) via email attachment. No other format is allowed.
  3. Who is eligible to participate? This essay and poetry writing competition is open for school students of all countries. College and university students are not eligible to participate.
  4. I am just under 15 or just over 18 – can I still participate? This competition is intended only for school students between 15 – 18 years of age. If you are between these ages on 30 June 2013, you are eligible. No exceptions will be granted. If you are 18 years and 1 day on that date, you are still eligible, so long as you don’t reach 19 years. Those who are 14 years and 11 months will not be considered as you have not reached 15.
  5. In what language shall I submit my work? This essay can only be written in English.
  6. Am I allowed to include graphs, tables, or diagrams in my essay? Yes, you are welcome (but not obliged to) to include the mentioned. The content will not count into the total number of words in your essay. Please make sure you explain what each graph, table, or diagram represents.
  7. What is the summary of the essay? You are asked to write a summary to go with your essay, which cannot exceed 200 words. The summary should explain the aim, the methodology, the reasoning and main conclusion of your essay. The summary is important, as pre-selection of the essays will be based on the assessment of these only. This means that a good essay without a summary or a poorly written summary will not be graded highly.
  8. What are the evaluation criteria for the submissions? Essays will be graded for their structure and coherence, originality and creativity and the use of thoughtful and concrete proposals / examples.
  9. Do I need to address all questions? Yes, you need to address all questions in your essay.

 

 

Prizes

Essay Writing Category

  1. First Prize – US$350.00 and a distinguished award certificate
  2. Second Prize – US$250.00 and a distinguished ward certificate.
  3. Third Prize – US$150.00 and a distinguished award certificate.
  4. Seven consolation prizes of US$100.00 each and merit award certificates.

Poetry Writing Category

  1. First Prize – US$350.00 and a distinguished award certificate
  2. Second Prize – US$250.00 and a distinguished ward certificate.
  3. Third Prize – US$150.00 and a distinguished award certificate.
  4. Seven consolation prizes of US$100.00 each and merit award certificates

Contact :

E-mail : aiwc2013@asiskl.org

  • SM Sains Alam Shah
    Jalan Yaacob Latif
    Bandar Tun Razak
    56000, Cheras
    Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaTelephone :+603 91315014
    Fax : +603 91318119website : www.asiskl.org
    E-mail : asiskl@asiskl.org
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Hello world! Welcome to AICW2013 website

Welcome to AIWC2013
- ASiS International Essay and Poetry Writing Competition website.

Any suggestion or comment, please email to aiwc2013@asiskl.org

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